Frisky’s Longest Day, June 6, 1944

Airpower played a vital role in the defeat of the Axis in World War II, and was key to the success of the Normandy landings in June, 1944. On so on this 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings, we take a moment to remember the contributions of the Airmen of the 371st Fighter Group.

Airpower for Normandy came in many forms. Troop carrier units brought airborne divisions from England to France, heavy, medium and light bombers pummeled a variety of targets from near the shore to inland. Reconnaissance aircraft scurried about to gather the latest images of the battlefield and other key points or areas of interest. Fighters protected the invasion fleet, and fighter bombers such as the 371st Fighter Group ranged inland attacking fixed targets and targets of opportunity.

As Frisky’s Longest Day began, however, all was silent at the home field of the 371st Fighter Group at Bisterne Airfield in England. Aircraft sounds reverberated in the skies over England and all the way over to France, but the 371st Fighter group had no tasking early on D-Day. Although the Allies had control of the skies for operations on 6 June, it was impossible to put the 8,000 Allied aircraft of all types available into the skies at the same time in order to achieve the desired effects. Some units had to wait for their turn to contribute to the effort.

Review of the 371FG records shows how that momentous day went for the group. The June, 1944 history records that “…everyone woke up early to find the sky darkened with planes of every variety thundering their way across the channel.” But still there were no orders from IX Fighter Command. Unit members were on their second cup of coffee in the morning as they listened to the radio waiting to hear the big news.

“Everyone was alerted and eager to get into the air.” Finally the news came in over the radio, “This morning Allied troops landed…” But the group had no orders, and “…ordinary work seemed of secondary importance…” though “every man’s thoughts were with the men who were storming the beaches of France at the moment and a unified prayer went out to these gallant troops, these our men.”

Around mid-day, the action finally began for Frisky, the nickname for the 371st Fighter Group. Group records do not have a copy of any teletype order for the first combat mission of the day, but do contain a hand written operations order, No. 346, from IX Fighter Command, which suggests it was received over the telephone. The hand written order indicated urgency “…time of takeoff and over target as soon as possible.”

D-Day targets for the group were “Military traffic on the following road network: Coutances to Carentan, Coutances to St. Lo, Coutances to La Haye-du-Puits, St. Lo to 1 mile SW of Bayeux, and from Vire to Isigny-sur-Vire-Caumont.” This would mostly help interdict the movement of German forces approaching the American landing beaches at Utah and Omaha.

371FG Targets on DDay

The group was ready to act and soon launched a total of 42 P-47’s from its three fighter squadrons, carrying three 500-lb bombs each, with AN/M103 nose and AN/M101-A1 tail fuzes set for instantaneous bursting. Thirteen more of the group’s P-47’s served as escorts for the dive-bombers, whilst two more were used for radio relay between the home base and the target area, for a total of 58 aircraft sent on the mission. Fifty seven would return.

First into the air was the 405th Fighter Squadron with 18 P-47’s at 1241, led by the squadron commander, Major Harvey L. Case, Jr. Due to weather conditions, they flew at 4,000 feet on their ingress, 14 of the aircraft carrying three 500-lb bombs each. Commencing their dive on the target, the railroad marshaling yard at Coutances, from 4,000 feet, at 30-degrees, they released their bombs at 1,500 feet and pulled out.

405th Fighter Squadron Commander and leader on both D-Day missions was Major Harvey L. Case, Jr.  He led the squadron from July, 1943, to September, 1944.  (Courtesy “The 371st Fighter Group in the E.T.O.” via 406FS P-47 Pilot Francis E. Madore)

405th Fighter Squadron Commander and leader on both D-Day missions was Major Harvey L. Case, Jr. He led the squadron from July, 1943, to September, 1944. (Courtesy “The 371st Fighter Group in the E.T.O.” via 406FS P-47 Pilot Francis E. Madore)

In addition to dive bombing they strafed trains at St. Lo and at La Haye-du-Puits. It is perhaps ironic that one of Frisky’s first targets on D-Day, La Haye-du-Puits, is near the family farm of Yvette Hamel, the French farmgirl later wounded by German artillery and adopted for recuperation by the 371st Fighter Group when the group was based in France at Sainte-Mère-Église.

Next into action was the 406th Fighter Squadron, 20 P-47’s up at 1254, led by the squadron’s Commanding Officer, Major Edwin D. Taylor. They made landfall at Granville, ingressing at 1,000 feet. They strafed one train from 20 feet, and another from 100 feet, and 18 aircraft dive-bombed the small railroad yard between Percy and Hambye.

406th Fighter Squadron Commander and leader on both D-Day missions was Major Edwin D. Taylor.  He led the squadron from July, 1943, to September, 1944.  (Courtesy “The 371st Fighter Group in the E.T.O.” via 406FS P-47 Pilot Francis E. Madore)

406th Fighter Squadron Commander and leader on both D-Day missions was Major Edwin D. Taylor. He led the squadron from July, 1943, to September, 1944. (Courtesy “The 371st Fighter Group in the E.T.O.” via 406FS P-47 Pilot Francis E. Madore)

The 404th Fighter Squadron also joined it, 16 P-47’s led by squadron commander Major Rodney E. Gunther, up at 1516 hours for armed reconnaissance to attack enemy traffic on the road network in support of the invasion. Twelve P-47’s dive bombed from 4,000 feet, in a 30-degree dive, releasing their three 500-lb bombs at 1,500 feet, striking a small highway bridge at Vire, and rail cars at Coutances and Granville, and also strafing trucks at several locations.

404th Fighter Squadron Commander and leader on both D-Day missions was Major Rodney E. Gunther.  He led the squadron from July, 1943, to October, 1944.  (Courtesy “The 371st Fighter Group in the E.T.O.” via 406FS P-47 Pilot Francis E. Madore)

404th Fighter Squadron Commander and leader on both D-Day missions was Major Rodney E. Gunther. He led the squadron from July, 1943, to October, 1944. (Courtesy “The 371st Fighter Group in the E.T.O.” via 406FS P-47 Pilot Francis E. Madore)

The German anti-aircraft gunners near Granville whose flak was described as “moderate, heavy and accurate,” were able to hit the P-47 flown by 404FS pilot 2nd Lt. Joseph E. LaRochelle. He had to abandon his stricken Thunderbolt, P-47D-20 serial number 43-25278, and bail out some 200 yards off the coast at Granville. His parachute opened successfully and he survived, though as a result he became the first 371FG prisoner of war.

404th Fighter Squadron pilots gather for a photo in the spring of 1944, possibly taken at Bisterne Airfield’s camp area.  Kneeling, second from the left is 2nd Lt. Joseph E. LaRochelle, who became the 371st Fighter Group’s first pilot shot down and captured by the enemy when he bailed out of his flak-stricken P-47 overwater just off Granville, Normandy, on the afternoon of June 6, 1944.   Standing in the back row, sixth from the right, is Harry W. “Pop” Strahlendorf, who flew both missions that day, quoted in this article.  Full ID of personnel in picture as follows:  Standing, left to right are H. Robson (only partially visible at left edge), I. Killingsworth, S. Greer, W. Walling, L. Hammer, H. Gilmer, H. Strahlendorf, W. Bunce, W. Richter, R. Stoddard, H. Wagner and R. Haney. Kneeling left to right are L. Scott, J. LaRochelle, G. O’Toole, J. Green, W. Brown, G. Banks, and J. Cassells. In front, left to right are L. Myles, and K. Cobb. (Courtesy “The 371st Fighter Group in the E.T.O.” via 406FS P-47 Pilot Francis E. Madore)

404th Fighter Squadron pilots gather for a photo in the spring of 1944, possibly taken at Bisterne Airfield’s camp area. Kneeling, second from the left is 2nd Lt. Joseph E. LaRochelle, who became the 371st Fighter Group’s first pilot shot down and captured by the enemy when he bailed out of his flak-stricken P-47 overwater just off Granville, Normandy, on the afternoon of June 6, 1944. Standing in the back row, sixth from the right, is Harry W. “Pop” Strahlendorf, who flew both missions that day, quoted in this article. Full ID of personnel in picture as follows: Standing, left to right are H. Robson (only partially visible at left edge), I. Killingsworth, S. Greer, W. Walling, L. Hammer, H. Gilmer, H. Strahlendorf, W. Bunce, W. Richter, R. Stoddard, H. Wagner and R. Haney. Kneeling left to right are L. Scott, J. LaRochelle, G. O’Toole, J. Green, W. Brown, G. Banks, and J. Cassells. In front, left to right are L. Myles, and K. Cobb.
(Courtesy “The 371st Fighter Group in the E.T.O.” via 406FS P-47 Pilot Francis E. Madore)

Altogether the group expended 128 500-lb bombs and 34, 568 rounds of .50 caliber machine gun ammunition. Several aircraft received battle damage, but those fit to fly again were soon readied for another mission over Normandy.

Meanwhile, another operations order arrived, this time over the teletype, No. 349, from IX FC. This time the target was a lot closer to the landing beaches, and consisted of enemy gun emplaces at Isigny, roughly 10 miles southwest of Omaha Beach, in between Omaha and Utah beaches. Fifty four aircraft were launched, with four P-47s escorting the rest, dive-bombers carrying a trio of 500-pounders with instantaneous fuzes.

The 406FS was first in the air at 1925, 18 P-47’s led by Maj. Taylor. By 2000 hours they were over the target and dived from 8,500 feet at a 40-degree angle, the 16 dive-bombers releasing their bombs at 2,000 feet. Guns were not observed occupying the emplacements, but the bombs were dropped as ordered. In the vicinity of St. Lo, two rockets were noted passing through 10,000 feet leaving a white trail behind them. Meager, light flak was noted in the target area.

The 405th took off next at 1947, with 16 bomb-toting P-47’s and a pair of P-47 escorts led by Maj. Case. They dove on the target from 10,000 feet at a 50-degree angle, releasing at 3,000 feet, and also noted no guns in the emplacements they struck. No opposition was reported.

Last but not least, the 404th led by Maj. Gunther took off at 2006, with 18 P-47’s all bombed up. They ingressed at 9,000 feet, and dove in on their target at 2039 at a reported 60-degree angle and releasing weapons at 3,000 feet, hitting six gun emplacements. No opposition was noted.

The three squadrons returned without loss, with the last one down by 2156 hours. Frisky had expended another 147 500-lb bombs and 15, 369 rounds of .50 caliber ammunition on the mission.

This was the 371st Fighter Group’s contribution to the Longest Day, 112 sorties in support of the Allied landings in Normandy. P-47 pilot 1st Lt. Harry W. “Pop” Strahlendorf of the 404th Fighter Squadron, who flew both missions that day, wrote home about his experience a couple of days later: “I had a grand stand seat that I bet a lot of people would have paid $1,000 for. However I wouldn’t have given it up for anything.”

1 St Lt Harry W. "Pop" Strahlendorf poses with his P-47D Thunderbolt which he named "Eddie Nor" (Courtesy Mr. Harry Strahlendorf, Jr.)

1St Lt Harry W. “Pop” Strahlendorf, 404th Fighter Squadron, poses with his P-47D Thunderbolt which he named “Eddie Nor-II” Note the keystone emblem representing his home state.  (Courtesy Mr. Harry Strahlendorf, Jr.)

And so it was, from the afternoon into the evening hours of June 6, 1944, Airmen with a connection to the 142nd Fighter Wing contributed to the success of the D-Day landings. The Allied foothold gained in Normandy set into motion a series of campaigns and battles across northwestern Europe in which the Frisky was destined to play a key role in. Their efforts hastened the end of a long and bloody war to defeat fascism in the European Theater of Operations.

References, and material adapted from:

D-Day, June 6, 1944, The Longest Day, posted by 142d Fighter Wing Public affairs on June 6, 1014, at: http://www.142fw.ang.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123413568

“The 371st Fighter Group in the E.T.O.” Army & Navy Publishing, Baton Rouge, LA, 1946, copy via 406FS P-47 Pilot Francis E. Madore

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